A Boy And His Tire

Jeannette Godoy

How did you get into directing?
Growing up I was a ballet dancer, but at 5’3’’, I wasn’t exactly music video babe material, so I decided to pursue choreography. I got a couple of big breaks, including “CB4” and the “Baby Got Back” music video and it took off from there. I traveled the world doing choreography for a myriad of projects. I was often recruited to help out with dancer’s costumes and that was my first foray into styling. I was also able to production design several spots and I knew it was time to make the jump up to the bigger picture. A couple of my directors really encouraged me to take the leap, knowing my passion for all of the details and my commitment to the work. You could say I’ve been in Practical Film School all this time.

What is your most recent project?
I just finished a spec spot for Rhapsody, which is an homage to the end scene of Flashdance. A little girl goes into an audition for a ballet conservatory but messes up. She asks to start over and changes the music to hip hop. When she spins, her ballet slippers magically turn into funky high tops and she busts out an in-your-face hip hop routine and blows the judges away. It’s really sweet.

What is the best part of being a director?
Directing means being a leader and drawing the very best out of your team. I love that everyone comes to the table with their A game. It’s exciting to collaborate with talented and motivated people to get the best ideas forward. What can I say? I like being in charge of all of that creativity.

Have you a mentor and if so, who is that person (or persons)
and what has been the lesson learned from that mentoring which resonates most with you?

My father, who came to this country absolutely penniless, and worked tirelessly to educate himself, is my mentor and an inspiration. He has instilled in me a constant quest for knowledge and a desire to always move forward creatively and intellectually. Both my parents have been incredibly supportive of my many artistic and life pursuits. I aspire to be that for my own children.