Bonjour

Laurent Soriano

How did you get into directing?
I grew up in Aix en Provence, France. At 8 years old I directed my first play, an adaptation of the “Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint Exupery. The emotions I discovered in the process convinced me that being a director was something very special and something I could not get enough of. From then on, I was the official theater/film guy at school with the yearly “Laurent Soriano Productions Presents”. I then focused my education towards filmmaking starting in Paris and then in Los Angeles. I studied theater, cinema and acting. I have been working in the industry as a cameraman for many years on commercials, documentaries, feature films and TV series. My career as a cameraman has given me a thorough understanding of the technical and collaborative aspect of filmmaking. I decided to direct spec spots to build my reel and to fully transition from camera to directing.

What is your most recent project?
I have just finished two new spec spots. One is for “Nike Golf” with Pete Sampras and the other one is for “Perrier” with Bridgette Wilson- Sampras. I am also developing a story for a feature film.

What is the best part of being a director?
The best part of being a director is having the opportunity to share my vision and sensitivity with others. I enjoy combining all of the independent components of a film production in an effort to tell the story in an artistic way. It inspires me to work with actors and to be in the front row watching their performances evolve.

Have you a mentor and if so, who is that person (or persons)
and what has been the lesson learned from that mentoring which resonates most with you?

I do not have a mentor as such, but I remember going to the DGA in Los Angeles for a “Q and A” with the directors nominated for the DGA Awards. Ridley Scott was nominated for Black Hawk Down and what he said to the audience resonated with me. He was asked, “How did you manage to stay in control of such big productions with so many elements, so many people to work with, so many cameras rolling at the same time.” He answered, “You just get it done”. It was such a simple and true answer and I have never forgotten it.